Real Friends

Real Friends

$15.95 $12.95
In this graphic-novel memoir, Hale examines a theme familiar to any kid: the making, keeping, and losing of friends. The book starts in 1979, as a perky, pale redheaded Shannon heads off to kindergarten, and follows her through sixth grade, with Shannon negotiating various discoveries and setbacks along the way. Her doctor and mother shrug off what would now be labeled obsessive-compulsive disorder and extreme anxiety, and with home (her older sibling Wendy, drawn by the talented Pham as an actual ferocious bear most of the time) and school (more bullies and toadies than good guys) causing stress, Shannon's a mess. When she finally hits the right crowd, there's a glorious sense of freedom and joy. A candid author's note and pictures of Hale as a child reinforce the authenticity of the tale-this is a woman who lived through some rough early childhood years, even with the moments of pure fantasy and joy sprinkled in. Pham's visual version of Hale expresses everything, with bright creativity and intense emotional suffering warring across her face, her body posture, and even in her gait. Hale fans will appreciate the look behind the curtain at where some of her amazing book ideas are rooted, and kids who have struggled with the complexity of grade school friendships, i.e., any kid, will find comfort that the dark days can be survived. AS
Title Real Friends
Author Hale, Shannon (Author), Pham, Leuyen (Illustrator)
Publisher First Second
SKU ING-ENG-1649
ISBN 9781626727854
In this graphic-novel memoir, Hale examines a theme familiar to any kid: the making, keeping, and losing of friends. The book starts in 1979, as a perky, pale redheaded Shannon heads off to kindergarten, and follows her through sixth grade, with Shannon negotiating various discoveries and setbacks along the way. Her doctor and mother shrug off what would now be labeled obsessive-compulsive disorder and extreme anxiety, and with home (her older sibling Wendy, drawn by the talented Pham as an actual ferocious bear most of the time) and school (more bullies and toadies than good guys) causing stress, Shannon's a mess. When she finally hits the right crowd, there's a glorious sense of freedom and joy. A candid author's note and pictures of Hale as a child reinforce the authenticity of the tale-this is a woman who lived through some rough early childhood years, even with the moments of pure fantasy and joy sprinkled in. Pham's visual version of Hale expresses everything, with bright creativity and intense emotional suffering warring across her face, her body posture, and even in her gait. Hale fans will appreciate the look behind the curtain at where some of her amazing book ideas are rooted, and kids who have struggled with the complexity of grade school friendships, i.e., any kid, will find comfort that the dark days can be survived. AS

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